Happy No-More-Chemo Anniversary

Alan and I have been walking three miles around the neighborhood in the evenings together. Each time, we go through the same back and forth about what time we will go. I want to go immediately after we finish dinner. He wants to wait 45 minutes, then go.

You see, Alan and I are a lot alike when it comes to structure and schedules in our lives. I think it is why we get along so well. But one major difference between us is my ridiculous inability to relax until all the work is done. I carry this habit into every part of my life – I can’t relax during the week until I feel like I have a handle on things at work. I can’t relax on the weekends until I feel like our house is at least somewhat picked up and clean and any errands have been run. And, each evening, I can’t relax until we have made, eaten and cleaned up after dinner and gone for our walk. Because, let’s face it, the walk is work.

Why am I telling you this?

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Surgery No. 8 — this one was not planned

It’s 9:22 a.m. as I start this post. We are waiting for surgery.

We’re in a common area on the third floor of the main MD Anderson building. Jenny is trying not think about food, but she’s already planned for us to order Pappasito’s takeout to the hotel this evening. Her appetite is currently much larger than the one she’ll have this evening, I think.

Pappasito’s is attached to the nice hotel we are staying at in downtown Houston, so it’s in her head. Priceline gave us a very good deal at that hotel much better than the prices for much lesser hotels in the medical district area.

Why are we waiting for surgery today? Especially after Jenny declared 2015 a surgery-free year?

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2015 is going to be a good year

So, I wrote a really long blog post the weekend after I got home from the hospital. Things got busy and hectic and I never posted it so I just posted it and back dated it. Sorry for cheating.

On Friday night – two days after I got home — Alan and I went to do my meds around 9:30 p.m. To add to all of the craziness and bad luck that has gone on lately, my line was clogged. Apparently your blood can tend to clot around the foreign object that you have in your body. We knew one side was clogged, but when the other side was clogged on Friday, the only option was to make a trip to the ER.

I cried.

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Home and on the mend

We pulled in to our garage around 2:30 a.m. on Thursday morning after a looooong week at MD Anderson. We were beat.

(So was poor Krisan who was so kind and stayed with our kids until we got home even though she had to work the next day – I got lucky when she and I met almost 20 years ago.)

Before leaving, Alan took his PICC line test that allows him to give me my meds and clean and change my dressing. It is really important that we are very careful to keep it sterile so the process of changing my dressing is VERY tough. They require him to demonstrate his abilities while a nurse observes.

Here are some pics of him as he tested:

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Day 3: Waiting for skin to return to normal

We’re just waiting for Jenny’s skin color on her left side to return to normal.

Today was pretty simple. The only drama was with the ultrasound of the infected area.

Jenny’s white blood cell count is back within normal range. And she felt pretty good for the bulk of the day.

But the redness on her skin has grown, which is a ‘clinical sign’ of infection. (The quotes around ‘clinical sign’ come from Katie, Dr. Kronowitz’s PA.)

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Day 2: Waiting, getting a PICC line … and more waiting

Today is a little better than the day before. That’s pretty much the goal with these stays in the hospital. We found that out when we were here in 2012.

Jenny has had more energy today. She even got up and showered. And she got out her computer and did some Christmas shopping.

But she’s also felt worn out and nauseous at other times. They are pumping her with lots of medicine. She’s not taking Hydrocodone, though. She hates that stuff, so they’re giving her Ibuprofin to manage the pain that she still has.

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